Bringing together research and teaching in a blog

Bez tytułu

I like the way this blog functions. It was created as an outlet for the work of her undergraduates. They bring together research and teaching, and in the process are building a substantial community of interest. This methodology could perfectly works out for other subjects like sociology or research methods, publishing the working class discussions, case studies or whatever. For instance, when working on shrinkage, every student could find and describe cases of shrinking cities all over the world and then blog them. This may contribute to both engage students in class and build a community of interests around certain research interests and topics.

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Working rights in Poland

The Niezalezny Samorzadny Zwiazek Zawodowy “Solidarnosc” (NSZZ SOLIDARNOSC) reported the dismissal of a shop steward at ADO factory located in the special economic zone of Legnica in March 2013 for having hung a union flag at the factory’s gate. The Polish National Forest company also sent a letter to a Solidarnosc to prohibit displaying flags during protests.

There have been numerous reports on discriminatory dismissal of trade unionists. In December 2013, Adam Guzy was dismissed from Fakos Ltd due to his trade union activities. A complaint asking for reinstatement and compensation has been filed with the courts. Trade unionist Robert Kluga who works for CCP “PREMA” SA in Kielce was dismissed during the negotiations of a collective agreement in March 2014 with a view to undermine the collective bargaining process. LG Electronics  Wroclaw targeted union members in the company in order to crush the existence of the union by not renewing employment contracts of union activists and leaders. In November 2013, Leszek Rudzinski, a shop steward at Lubelskich Liniach Autobusowych and a union chairman, was dismissed during a collective dispute. Both the National Labour Inspection and the Court have deemed the dismissal unlawful, and M. Rudzinski has been reinstated and compensated.

Source: International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) Global rights index: the world’s worst countries for workers.

The world’s worst countries for workers

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Interesting and high quality report on global rights index. An example of high quality and global secondary data source. It offers a list of countries rating from 1 to 5+ (pp. 15), where 5+ means “No guarantee of rights due to the breakdown of the rule of law” and 1 “Irregular Violations of Rights”.

I also like the mixed methods approach applied, as well as the sophisticate development of indicators to measure the violation of working rights (pp. 29-35). You can also see in the first pages examples of the worst countries, and a a but consistent evaluation of working rights violation in many other countries of Asia, America, Africa and Europe.

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My new blog background #manila #philippines

What you can see here is a photo taken in Manila (Philippines). Concretly, the buildings in the background are the so called Makati city, if I remember correctly. Why I’ve chosen this photo for my blog background? Well, for three reasons.

  1. First, it reflects in a single view my research interests, i.e. rapid growth, urban development, inequality, residential segregation, among others, also environment and climate change in the Global South ( the river waters (here isn’t entirely appreciable) are very contaminated)
  2. Second, because it was me who took this picture during my work experience in 2009. I indeed keep very good memories from that trip. I hope one day upload more pictures.
  3. Third, because I’ve noticed a blog hits growth from Philippines, becoming actually the fifth most frequent visitors.
Manila_@socioloxia

Xaquín S. Pérez-Sindín López @socioloxia

CLICK TO SEE LARGER IMAGE

Richard Wolff: Detroit a “Spectacular Failure” of System that Redistributes Pay from Bottom to Top

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Social and Physical Disorder in the Urban Metropolis #ferrol #galiza #spain

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Ferrol Vello, the old town of the third larger metropolitan areas of the Autonomous Community of Galicia (Spain) (163,669 inhabitants in 2009) Clear example of social and physical disorder in urban metropolis. I used to walk by this place a few years ago when I was living in Ferrol. It just poped up in my mind when reading the call for papers for the session “Understanding Social and Physical Disorder in the Urban Metropolis” within the International Sociological Association held in Japan past July. The session description suggests that this kind of disorders may be caused by different reasons.

That disorder is not reducible to objective measurements of crime or social problems. While the presence of disorder can signal that an area is vulnerable, triggering the exodus of residents and businesses, in other neighbourhoods disorder can represent diversity and a cultural edginess.

In this case, it seems rather obvious that the social and physical disorder responds more to the second option, i.e. it is a signal that the area is vulnerable, triggering the exodus of residents and businesses. Ferrol is a shipyard city that has been suffering from shrinkage since the economic restructuring in the 80′, as well as certain incapacity to face the crisis in certain years.
Furthermore, the specific pictures that I uploaded refer to a very specific location within the old town. According to my informants, this area used to hold high prostitution activity during the boom experienced by the city in the shipbuilding industry in previous decades.

Communities in Transition

Interesting topic to undertake a new research or write a paper. It’s a session held during the previous International Sociological Association congress in Japan, and within the Research Committee on Community Research, RC03. What I like most is idea of studying the different strategies adopted by cities to face global changes. Concretely, those resisting the changes. My thesis dissertation acknowledge this resistance in mining communities, indeed.

Communities in Transition. Part I

Session Organizer
Johan ZAAIMAN, North-West University, South Africa, johan.zaaiman@nwu.ac.za

Session in English

Communities are continuously challenged by a changing world. Within an increasing interdependent and globalized world they are pressed into a process of continuous change. Communities differ in their response strategies. Some restructure themselves, others transform themselves, others resist the changes, and still others find themselves marginalized and unable to cope positively with the changes.

This session explores the challenges this transition poses to communities, as well as their impact on communities and the strategies communities utilize to handle them.

Papers are welcomed which explore these issues through comparative and/or case studies thereby elucidating the unique and the common factors found in communities in transition.