“The Strength of Weak Ties” by Granovetter’s

Granovetter’s paper “The Strength of Weak Ties” is a highly influential research, with about 30,000 citations according to Google Scholar (by October 2014). In 1969 Granovetter submitted it to American Sociological Review, but it was rejected. One of the reviewers stated: “…it should not be published. I respectfully submit the following among an endless series of reasons that immediately came to mind”; the other added: “… I find that his scholarship is somewhat elementary.. [he] has confined himself to a few older and obvious items”. [4] Eventually this pioneering research was published in 1973 in American Journal of ‪Sociology‬ and became the most cited work in the Social Sciences. In marketing, information science, or politics, weak ties enable reaching populations and audiences that are not accessible via strong ties. The concepts and findings of this work were later published in the monograph Getting A Job, an adaptation of Granovetter’s doctoral dissertation at Harvard University‘s Department of Social Relations, with the title: “Changing Jobs: Channels of Mobility Information in a Suburban Population” (313 pages)

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One thought on ““The Strength of Weak Ties” by Granovetter’s”

  1. The concepts and findings of this work were later published in the monograph Getting A Job, an adaptation of Granovetter’s doctoral dissertation at Harvard University’s Department of Social Relations, with the title: “Changing Jobs: Channels of Mobility Information in a Suburban Population” (313 pages).
    http://www.google.pl/books?hl=pl&lr=&id=R7-w4BLg7dAC&oi=fnd&pg=PP9&dq=Getting+A+Job&ots=uEAUk4Esxv&sig=Sx1ewSIbeaWDT-LRjzVwi7m_90s&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Getting%20A%20Job&f=false

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