Mapped: EU coal plants.

Advertisements

Creating great questions in class with Kahoot

Rural gentrification, research project

The research will examine the degree to which rural gentrification should be viewed as a ‘translocal’ phenomenon involving flows of people into and out of a locality, as well as consider the role of ‘financialisation’ in the formation of rural gentrification. The research will involve interviews and ethnographic research within estate agencies, as well as interviews with rural residents and web- and questionnaire- based surveys. The student will be working alongside researchers involved in a major international project examining rural gentrification in the UK, France and USA.

http://www.i-rgent.com/irgent-publications/

“Paterson” A film that chronicles beautifully banal life in a post-industrial district

Book: “Working-Class Heroes”

Chicago’s Southwest Side is one of the last remaining footholds for the city’s white working class, a little-studied and little-understood segment of the American population. This book paints a nuanced and complex portrait of the firefighters, police officers, stay-at-home mothers, and office workers living in the stable working-class community known as Beltway. Building on the classic Chicago School of urban studies and incorporating new perspectives from cultural geography and sociology, Maria Kefalas considers the significance of home, community, and nation for Beltway residents.
9225-110

Book: “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis”

From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

51idsm4kvzl-_sx329_bo1204203200_

European Coal Map (video)