“The Future of Cities”, documentary


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/195304295″>The Future of Cities</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/ohboyson”>Oscar Boyson</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

 

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“Why we bike?” Documentary

To the Dutch, cycling is as normal as breathing. We don’t think about it, we just do it. Perhaps the fact that we don’t think about it, is the key to the bicycle’s success in this country. But because we do not give cycling a second thought, we don’t really know what the deeper needs of cyclists are. In the documentary ‘Why we cycle’ we take a ride with ordinary cyclists and specialists from a variety of disciplines. These conversations uncover some obvious, but even more hidden effects of cycling on people, on societies, and on the organization of cities.

Rush Hour, a documentary on “hypercommuters” today

Rush Hour Synopsis: A feature documentary about the odyssey involved in commuting to and from work in three large contemporary cities: Los Angeles, Istanbul and Mexico City. Rush Hour is an intimate approach to the personal stories of three commuters who spend hours of their lives going from home to work and back, reflection a common reality shared by billions of people. What is the impact of these lost hours on their relationships an their quality of life? What really direves them to make this journey every day? What does this say about our cities and our way of living them? This is not inherent of a specific area of the world, neither it has to do with gender or class, but rather it is a global issue that has to do with the way we have developed and conceived our largest cities.

Further info: https://www.citylab.com/life/2018/05/awful-commuting-unites-us-all/560624/?utm_source=SFTwitter

 

“The nothing factory” a movie on de-industrialization

It follows a group of factory workers who go on strike in an attempt to block the relocation of their workplace by its crooked owners. Vasco Viana was the cinematographer and the film was shot on 16mm. Cláudia Oliveira was the editor and João Gazua handled sound. According to a statement from Directors’ Fortnight artistic director Édouard Waintrop, the film “dissects and riffs on the subject of de-industrialization, unemployment, and the workers’ struggle”. Source

“Paterson” A film that chronicles beautifully banal life in a post-industrial district

“I, Daniel Blake”, a film to reflect on modernity and the disappearance of middle-class jobs

Brexit, Trump victory, both are fuelled by economic changes, but also the decline of once-cherished institutions, including family, church and labour unions, all contributing to a fear that the world is changing in ways that workers, or else their children, cannot keep up with. “There used to be a lot more middle-class jobs,” said Clyde bleakly, another concrete ladler (source). “These days there are just people high up working on computers and a lot of guys working in Denny’s.” Hence, Not only is capitalism creating a lot of pointless jobs, but making disappear “classic jobs” or middle-class jobs.