Tool for creating and publishing interactive maps

Screenshot_4

https://www.zeemaps.com/

Advertisements

“Energy and Civilization” By Vaclav Smil

Energy is the only universal currency; it is necessary for getting anything done. The conversion of energy on Earth ranges from terra-forming forces of plate tectonics to cumulative erosive effects of raindrops. Life on Earth depends on the photosynthetic conversion of solar energy into plant biomass. Humans have come to rely on many more energy flows—ranging from fossil fuels to photovoltaic generation of electricity—for their civilized existence. In this monumental history, Vaclav Smil provides a comprehensive account of how energy has shaped society, from pre-agricultural foraging societies through today’s fossil fuel–driven civilization.

Humans are the only species that can systematically harness energies outside their bodies, using the power of their intellect and an enormous variety of artifacts—from the simplest tools to internal combustion engines and nuclear reactors. The epochal transition to fossil fuels affected everything: agriculture, industry, transportation, weapons, communication, economics, urbanization, quality of life, politics, and the environment. Smil describes humanity’s energy eras in panoramic and interdisciplinary fashion, offering readers a magisterial overview. This book is an extensively updated and expanded version of Smil’s Energy in World History (1994). Smil has incorporated an enormous amount of new material, reflecting the dramatic developments in energy studies over the last two decades and his own research over that time.

Creating great questions in class with Kahoot

Rural gentrification, research project

The research will examine the degree to which rural gentrification should be viewed as a ‘translocal’ phenomenon involving flows of people into and out of a locality, as well as consider the role of ‘financialisation’ in the formation of rural gentrification. The research will involve interviews and ethnographic research within estate agencies, as well as interviews with rural residents and web- and questionnaire- based surveys. The student will be working alongside researchers involved in a major international project examining rural gentrification in the UK, France and USA.

http://www.i-rgent.com/irgent-publications/

Book: “Working-Class Heroes”

Chicago’s Southwest Side is one of the last remaining footholds for the city’s white working class, a little-studied and little-understood segment of the American population. This book paints a nuanced and complex portrait of the firefighters, police officers, stay-at-home mothers, and office workers living in the stable working-class community known as Beltway. Building on the classic Chicago School of urban studies and incorporating new perspectives from cultural geography and sociology, Maria Kefalas considers the significance of home, community, and nation for Beltway residents.
9225-110

Book: “Hard Living on Clay Street: Portraits of Blue Collar Families”

In this revealing study of a white working class neighborhood in Washington, D.C., Howell shows us that there is more than one kind of blue collar worker in America today. Hard Living on Clay Street is about two very different blue collar families, the Shackelfords and the Mosebys. They are fiercely independent southern migrants, preoccupied with the problems of day-to-day living, drinking heavily, and often involved in unstable family relationships. Howell moved to Clay Street for a year with his wife and son and became deeply involved with the people, recording their story. As readers, we too become participants in the life of Clay Street, and not just observers, learning what “living on Clay Street” is all about.

518jsam78tl-_sx318_bo1204203200_

https://www.amazon.com/Hard-Living-Clay-Street-Portraits/dp/0881335266

“Research-informed comic” an innovative way to disseminate research results

research-informed-comic

See here the whole report